Espresso Machine Shopping: The Decision

(Note, I haven’t received my new machine yet, so this isn’t a review yet!)

I used to own a Baby Gaggia. I probably didn’t descale it at the right intervals, and even if I did, it appears that semi-automatic machines in general last about 4 or so years.  This machine worked for several years before it started to leak around the brew head (youtube says this is probably a bad gasket, they wear out). Also, flow dropped to about nothing. It returned after descaling, but then about a week later, no flow again. Forums suggest that this might have been bits of aluminum from the descaling clogging up the downstream holes and pipes.  The internet also says, of the three materials for tanks, aluminum, brass and stainless steel, aluminum corrodes the worst and fastest and is the most difficult to descale without damaging the tank.

Aluminum also accumulates in the brain and is associated with dementia. I’ve already eliminated all other sources of aluminum from my diet and environment, so I can’t really justify repairing this machine if it’s going to be putting aluminum flakes into my coffee. I don’t think I want to repair and sell it either. So with a heavy heart, it’s going to landfill.

What to get instead?

I got a bit of analysis paralysis. In order of complexity, here is what I considered:

Caffeine pills. I got a jar in the cupboard. I really only use them in emergencies.
Instant coffee. Reminds me of Europe, otherwise, not much to report.
Greek coffee. This is cooked in a pan on the stove. Never tried it, seems like it would be gritty.
French press. Too strong. My press is a bit broke and now I have try to filter it or deal with great gobs of grit.
Moka pot. Too strong. I don’t like the powder at the bottom of the cup.
Espresso from a cheap machine (those $50 ones). I used one like this for years. I think it was mostly ruining perfectly good coffee.
Another $400 espresso machine. These give you three or four variables to work with- beans, grind, tamp, pull time and that is about it. You get little feed back about if it is too hot, too cold, over pressure or what have you. These only have one year warranty and seem to have a lot of problems as if corners are being universally cut and the machines are trying to do something their parts are made for.
A step above that, which is something like a Breville BES920XL, which is what I ultimately chose, ~$1200 after discounts.
After that is the superautomatics that grind and brew coffee and steam milk on the press of one button. That’s boring. And those machines break down a lot as witnessed by the large number of superautomatics that are on sale as refurbished.

At the time, I was reading the Self Illusion, a book that reminds me that our brain is less unified than it seems. Parts of our brains make decisions and the conscious, internal monologue part *rationalizes* it, comes up with reasons to support a decision made by the non-rational part of the brain.

My toddler *loves* the coffee machine, especially the numerous steps to make coffee. He is going to really like the BES920XL. So maybe that was the clincher for my unconscious decider.

Rationalizations
People are repairing the machine. This means if it breaks, repair costs are low enough to warrant getting it fixed. One website implied a repair of a semiautomatic could run ballpark $150-$200, or about 1/2 to 1/4 the price of a new machine. So if it’s similar for a BES920XL, then in 3 or 5 years, I’ll just pay $200, get it repaired and it will run for another 5 years.
The machine comes with 2 years warranty. Amex extends that by a year. I ultimately bought it from Seattle Coffee, which also extends the warranty by a year, so I’m sort of double warrantied for the 3rd year.

Who to Buy From

I considered Macy’s, William Sonoma, Amazon, and Seattle Coffee. Macy’s offers Plenti points, which would have been worth around $30, but I couldn’t get a 10% discount. William Sonoma offered a 10% discount if I joined the mailing list.

Amazon offers via 3rd parties and one of them, iDrinkCoffee, was like $300 under the rest. It turns out that iDrinkCoffee is in Canada, which normally is fine, but that means me, an American, would have to pay around $80 in import taxes, $30 in currency conversion fees for Amex, (or $0 with Discover, but Discover doesn’t extend warranties.) Speaking of warranty, machines bought in Canada sometimes (always?) have to be serviced in Canada. And it turns out that electricity is a bit different in the US vs Canada, so the machine might actually be different– I have no idea about that tho. In short, I decided I couldn’t go with Canada.

I also decided to not get a damaged box unit from Amazon– it was $100s less, but was either no warranty or a few month warranty. So that was out.

When 1/5 of the reviews are people discussing breakdowns and repairs (I’m talking about all coffee machines, not just Breville) it follows we should take warranties serious.

I finally chose Seattle Coffee.  I tried to get the 10% discount, but instead got a 5% discount. It felt sort of like haggling with a machine. Seattle Coffee also offered a lot of freebies, like $100 gift card, free shipping, and so on.  Another deciding factor was the Seattle Coffee youtube vids– go watch them, they are obligatory for any modern coffee shopper– this isn’t a bottle of caffeine pills your buying here, there are a bunch of knowledge points you need to pick and use a machine.

Financing.
I’ll be financing it with Amex. I happen to have just opened an Amex account, so I get free credit for 1 year. I wanted to create a sinking fund to pay it off, but the bank is offering 0.01% interest. That isn’t 1 percent, that is 1 percent of 1 percent interest.  So a sinking fund would get me about 12c. Other banks offer 1%, whoo! Fortunately the stockmarket tanked, so maybe I’ll buy $1200 of stocks.

Anyhow, it should arrive in a few days, so I’ll have an excuse to blog again.

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